Category Archives: Projects

Enclosures: Novi (2018)

An ongoing human compulsion is to update and mark existing testaments left behind by others: some call it “vandalism” and others call it “embellishment,” and for as long as hominins have been building permanent edifices and monuments, others step in and leave their own mark. The bare wall, the lone boulder, the thin sod atop a chalk cliff…some rework, others augment. The motivations may be different but the end result identical: when faced with an industrial structure that sets off pareidolia, was it reworked out of a sense of removing a reminder that the current people in an area weren’t the first people? Did it have religious significance, either as the center of a new faith or a way to hide an old forbidden faith in plain sight? Or did the artist simply hate the idea of something remaining completely utilitarian and want to give a reason for others to visit a long-forgotten artifact?

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes burkei x hamata

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, resin, tumbled glass, epoxy putty, garnets.

Price: $ 200US

Shirt Price: $ 150US

Horsecrippler Ice Cream Project, Episode One

Backstory: a few years ago, the big Triffid Ranch project, before the gallery, was attempting s culinary project involving Echinocactus texensis, the barrel cactus commonly known in West Texas as “devil’s pincushions” or “horsecripplers.” After confirming that their other name, “candy cactus,” was due to the bright color and shape of their fruit, and not because the fruit was used to make candy as commonly claimed, the grand experiment involved using horsecrippler fruit as a base for homemade ice cream. The experiment was inconclusive, but intriguing enough that the intention was to try again. The setup and opening of the gallery intruded on future plans to try again, and the project remained fallow. We now go to the next part of the tale, already in progress.

By the beginning of 2018, all the signs of a potential bumper crop of horsecrippler cactus fruit were all there. The previous summer had been hot but not brutal, and winter temperatures were cold enough to encourage dormancy but not so cold as to stunt or kill the cactus. All of that went out the window in mid-March, when a series of cold fronts brought temperatures down to about freezing, throwing off schedules for blooming and fruit set. A trip to the area around the town of Mineral Wells confirmed the absolute worst: normally, one of the only times when horsecripplers were easy to spot in situ was around the end of May, when the fruit ripened and those little neon red bombs made the rest of the plant visible. An extensive search through the area turned up nothing: when horsecripplers don’t want birds to find their fruit, they don’t want to be found at all. The only ones found were right next to residences where they were a potential threat to people and animals, and the fruit were tiny and green. The same situation was true of the horsecripplers in cultivation by the greenhouse, and it looked as if that late cold killed the crop for the season. Plans for horsecrippler ice cream were dashed for 2018.

Echinocactus texensis

Well, that was the idea. Horsecrippler season was just delayed this year, by about two weeks. Suddenly, every last cultivated horsecrippler that flowered earlier in spring looked up, checked the clock, and screamed “We’re late!” A week before, a couple of green fruit the size of raisins were all that could be found. Now, big, fat, juicy ripe fruit, easily removed from the cactus. The first stage of the Ice Cream Project could begin.

Items needed:

Horsecrippler cactus fruit

Kitchen tongs

Cutting board and sharp knife

Smoothie maker or blender

Cheesecloth

Freezer containers

The two things to remember about gathering cactus fruit are that the purpose of that fruit is to transport seeds, and that the bright colors of most cactus fruit aren’t necessarily there to entice humans. The descriptive name “candy cactus” probably referred to the look of the fruit, not the taste, as fruit on the plant looks like a cluster of wrapped candies. The wrapper, officially known as the corolla, is the remnant of the bloom, and it has a definitive purpose here. Horsecrippler seeds are best spread by birds as they eat the fruit and spread the seeds in their dung, so the idea is to attract birds with bright coloration while dissuading everything else. The corolla does a masterful job of dissuading, as it has all of the softness and mouth feel of a dried thistle bloom. The fruit doesn’t have actual thorns or hairs the way prickly pear fruit does, but that corolla is still too sharp and spiky to grab with bare hands. That’s where kitchen tongs come in handy: a slight twist and ripe fruit just pulls free.

Now the real fun begins. While the corolla makes a handy pull-tab when removing the fruit, you definitely don’t want chunks of it in the next stage. To the cutting board all of it goes, to cut off corollas and any squishy or bruised parts and wash what’s left. A handy tip: when disposing of the corollas, don’t add them to your garden unless you really like pain. They tend to survive months in the garden, just as spiky as they were when dumped there, so try to bury them either deep enough or enough out of the way that they won’t turn up with a random raking. Your feet, knees, and hands will thank you later.

With access to a cutting board and sharp objects, now is a perfect time for a bit of botanical anatomy. Horsecrippler fruit really don’t have enough pulp to make it worth the effort to skin the fruit the way you would with prickly pear, and the peel actually adds what subtle flavor it has. In addition, the pulp is full of small but very tough seeds, the better to pass through a bird’s gizzard, and helping yourself to the pulp now is very much like chewing a spoonful of very sticky aquarium gravel. To continue requires removing those seeds, and that requires…

(*in Red Green voice*)…the cactus preparator’s secret weapon: a smoothie machine!  In actuality, any blender will work well, but aside from sentimental reasons (I picked this up in Tallahassee the same exact weekend I encountered my first carnivorous plant in the wild), having a stirring stick that can push down and stir fruit without opening the top is awfully handy. After the fruit is washed and dried, just drop everything in here and blend away. A little warning though…

THIS is why you don’t want to use the spout on a smoothie maker. Prickly pear seeds are large enough that they’re filtered out by the spout opening, allowing the resultant juice to drain out through the spigot. Prickly pear fruit also produces a lot more juice: horsecrippler fruit have proportionately more peel and pulp, so capillary action keeps the juice bound up with the rest of the pureed pulp. A little juice will escape, with enough seeds going along with it that closing the spout is nearly impossible.

Likewise, don’t bother putting the pulp into a colander or strainer. Even if adding additional water or other fruit juice, the pulp will just suck it up and refuse to drain. The best option is to pour the pulp into cheesecloth, and squeeze out the juice into a freezer container. The temptation will be strong to taste that juice, and that’s when you discover why prickly pear and dragonfruit are the only cactus fruit commercially raised for food. “Subtle” is a nice way of describing the flavor, with a touch of starchiness. The main attraction is the neon color, which is one of the reasons we’re doing this. Just pour that juice into freezer containers if you aren’t going to use it right away and freeze it: from previous experience, it freezes well and keeps for months. As for the remaining pulp, you can attempt to grow new horsecrippler cactus from the seeds (a longterm venture, as horsecrippler cactus are VERY slow-growing), or you can set out the pulp and seeds to delight the local songbirds. Set up a platform near your cat’s favorite window, and get double satisfaction from watching happy birds and listening to anxious and nearly incontinent cats. Win/win.

As for what to do next, well, that’s a reason to check back for Episode Two. It’s going to be a busy weekend.

Enclosures: Antarctica in Decline (2018)

Description: Very little is known about prehistoric Antarctica: with 98 percent of the continent covered with kilometers-thick ice, the few fossil beds accessible at the surface illuminate life there approximately 150 million years ago (including the discovery of the early theropod dinosaur Cryolophosaurus), approximately 65 million years ago, and the period surrounding the continent’s freeze 5 million years ago. Coal deposits and pollen samples from coring rigs are the main views of Antarctic plant life, as well as the inference from DNA analysis of the relationship between sundews from West Australia and Tierra del Fuego. It’s very possible that Antarctica had a wide and diverse population of carnivorous plants through its pre-freeze history, including relations to the Australian pitcher plant Cephalotus, but between the inaccessibility of most of its fossil-bearing strata and the poor fossilization record of carnivorous plants elsewhere, any discussion of Antarctic palaeofauna, especially of the period immediately after the extinction of the dinosaurs, is understandably speculative.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18″ x 18″ x 18″ (62.23 cm x 62.23 cm x 62.23 cm)

Plant: Cephalotus follicularis (2)

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, resin, tumbled glass, fiber-optic glass cabochons, polystyrene parts, found items,  aquarium spot lights.

Price: $500

Shirt Price: $400

Upcoming Projects: May 2018

It’s late in the month, and the classic Texas heat settled in a few weeks early, so the lack of updates is more to do with taking the habits of one Heloderma suspectum and working predominately under cover and in the wee hours. (Taking all habits might be a bad idea: the neighbors might take issue with sucking eggs and swallowing baby bunnies whole.) That means, though, that between shows and events, new enclosures are getting ready for premiere at summer Triffid Ranch gallery events. Here’s a taste, as part of a dry-fitting before making final adjustments and planting the final enclosure:

More to follow…

The State of the Gallery: March 2018

As regular readers might note, you didn’t get a state of the gallery update for February, mostly due to gallery-related distractions. Of course, February also didn’t get a full moon falling anywhere within it, either, which just meant one more good thing about March. Considering how fast March is moving, sliding through February was probably for the best.

As far as past and future events are concerned, February’s Date Night event was a mixed bag. The event itself was very successful, but as is the normal state of affairs with local weather, Date Night coincided with a nasty ice storm spreading through the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex that kept a lot of potential participants off the roads, and encouraged a lot of those who attended to leave early before the roads were impassable. This just means having to hold more events and showings during more clement conditions. This leads to:

Numero uno, things on the site are going to be extremely quiet through the end of next week, all due to the first external Triffid Ranch show of the year: All-Con in Addison. As in previous years, All-Con is a four-day show, running from Thursday to Sunday, with Thursday offering “try before you buy a weekend pass” free admission all day Thursday. Combine this with the already huge spring break contingent, and everyone is VERY glad the convention is running at a new, larger, and much more conveniently located hotel. Easy access to the hotel via DART buses, a wide range of restaurants within walking distance, a tremendous lineup of lectures and workshops…my only regret is that All-Con has that many activities scheduled through the weekend, but getting out from behind the table is pretty much an impossibility. This, of course, is a good thing.

Numero two-o, the next big show is seven weeks later, and if Texas Frightmare Weekend didn’t already exceed everyone’s expectations every year, people might be surprised to hear about plans for the next Triffid Ranch booth in May. Let’s just say that when running a booth in a convention already so packed that the convention announced that it has no more room for further guests, and that the host hotel has been booked solid since last year and attendees spill into FOUR more overflow hotels, getting away with a merely average display is unacceptable. In addition, not only is this the tenth Frightmare Weekend with a Triffid Ranch booth, but the end of the show falls on the tenth anniversary of the first-ever Triffid Ranch show, at the late and much-missed CAPE comic event off Lemmon Avenue in 2008. This, of course, demands a suitable anniversary celebration, so let’s see if everyone can pull it off.

Numero three-o: in between these two, don’t assume that the intervening six weeks will just be full of the usual panic about potting, casting, gluing, and painting, along with the usual snot-bubble crying of “I suck! I suck! I wanna go back to the mall!” in the corner. Since last year’s move preempted plans for a 2017 event, the Triffid Ranch proudly announces a return of a wildly popular event from the old ArtWalk and presents the Second Annual Manchester United Flower Show on April 6 and 7 from 6:00 to 10:00. Yes, it coincides with all sorts of other events in the Dallas area, including the Deep Ellum Arts Festival, but that happens all through the city in the weeks before the weather really heats up. Besides, where else are you going to go in the Dallas area to view carnivorous plant blooms and bracts and the plants that produce them?

Oh, to close up, and for the barest hint of what else to expect at the Manchester United Flower Show, here’s a sample of the centerpiece to a new enclosure:

Yes, this is a Cryolophosaurus skull, so anyone familiar with previous discussions on my fascination with the flora of pre-Pliocene Antarctica has an idea of what to expect. It and other enclosures premiere in April, so make plans to see the final enclosure after it’s planted and ready. See you then.

Enclosures: “A Canticle For Troodon” (2018)

A Canticle For Troodon

Description: The customer: a longtime customer and friend who had purchased a Nepenthes bicalcarata pitcher plant that outgrew its original container, and the new container needed to fit into the previous container’s alcove. The assignment: making a custom enclosure that needed to be “different”. The experiment: working with tumbled champagne bottle glass for its additional thickness and strength, on the structure of a resin Ceratosaurus skull. The finished skull is anchored via a shaft running into the base, and can be removed at any time for moving or maintenance. In addition, the skull is illuminated from within via two LED aquarium spot lights, and both lights may be turned on or off from outside the enclosure.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18″ x 18″ x 18″ (62.23 cm x 62.23 cm x 62.23 cm)

Plant: Nepenthes bicalcarata

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, resin, glass, glass taxidermy eye, polystyrene parts, found items, grapevine, aquarium spot lights.

Price: SOLD: custom commission

Shirt Price: SOLD

A Canticle For TroodonA Canticle For TroodonA Canticle For TroodonA Canticle For Troodon

Enclosure Gallery: Weather Station 228 (2017)

Weather Station 228 (2017)

Description: Travelers in the Columbia Gorge separating the states of Oregon and Washington may note various facilities seemingly extruded from the mountain rock: half-seen gates, windows, and doorways, in many cases belonging to automated weather forecasting stations watching for sudden storms or blizzards that could close off the Gorge. While they may be automated, they aren’t abandoned, even if years or decades go by between maintenance visits, and interfering with their operation is met with severe penalties. Keep that in mind.

Dimensions (width/height/depth):  18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes bicalcarata

Construction: Glass enclosure, vacuum-formed plastic, found items.

Price: $ 250US

Shirt Price: $ 200US

Enclosure Gallery: Emergency Support Bay 27B-6 (2017)

Emergency Support Bay 27B-6 (2017)

Description: When looking at fallout and other disaster shelters from the 1950s and 1960s, a comparison can be made to ancient tombs: collections of food, supplies, and furnishings intended for whatever lay beyond the valley of Death. How many caches of tools, weapons, and survival gear from the present and near future might be found hundreds, thousands, or millions of years later, either startlingly preserved or rotted away to uselessness?

Dimensions (width/height/depth):  18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes ampullaria

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, polycarbonate, found items.

Price: $ 300US

Shirt Price: $ 250US

Enclosure Gallery: Who Goes There? (2017)

Who Goes There? (2017)

Description: While 98 percent of Antarctica is currently covered with ice, much can be surmised of its natural history and paleontology from studying the life of both far antipodean South America and of southern Australia, both of which were attached to Antarctica before plate tectonics tore them apart. One of the most heartbreaking survivors is the Australian pitcher plant, Cephalotus follicularis, now found in the wild only in one small area south of Perth. Now isolated from all other flowering plants due to circumstance and mass extinction, Cephalotus may have had relations all over Antarctica…and there they remain until the ice melts.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 12 1/2″ x 13″ x 12 1/2″ (31.75 cm x 33.02 cm x 31.75 cm)

Plant:Cephalotus follicularis

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, vacuum-formed plastic, found items, thermoplastic cube,

Price: $ 150US

Shirt Price: $ 120US

Enclosure Gallery: Accelerator (2017)

Accelerator (2017)

Description: Famously described as one of the more difficult groups of carnivorous plant to keep in captivity, the Heliamphora pitcher plants of South America take well to enclosure life so long as they get a difficult combination in Texas: cooler temperatures with a lot of light. The backdrop’s framing of the central plant was accidental: in its previous life, it was a plastic insert at the bottom of a case of Valentine’s Day candy, intended to keep sampler boxes upright.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 19″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 48.26 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Heliamphora chimantensis

Construction: Glass enclosure, vacuum-formed plastic, nylon bolts, found items, stone.

Price: $ 200US

Shirt Price: $ 150US

Enclosure Gallery: Fortress of the Emerald Skull (2015)

Fortress of the Emerald Skull (2015)

Description: In the middle of painting the backdrop, the combination of elements gave the impression of a castle gate tall enough for an ogre, so the remaining elements were easy to add. An ogre-sized skull to warn off interlopers needed ferns to keep focus on the Nepenthes spectrabilis x veitchii growing from inside it, and the southern maidenhair ferns (Adiantum capillus-veneris) invoked ginkgoes so much that the samurai figure was necessary, both for mood and for scale. An additional bonus was that the ferns shed and regrow based on photoperiod, giving a drastically different appearance to the enclosure through the year if lighting light and dark cycles keep track with the seasons outside.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes spectrabilis x veitchii

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, resin, polyvinyl chloride figure.

Price: $ 200US

Shirt Price: $ 150US

Enclosure Gallery: Pumping Station (2016)

Pumping Station (2016)

Description: An experiment in a multiple-component backdrop, this enclosure contains two carnivorous plants. The upper terrace hosts a Nepenthes spathulata x veitchii hybrid, known both for large pitchers and a very tight leaf rosette. The lower terrace is the home of a surprise Cape sundew (Drosera capensis), most likely from seed that stowed away from the greenhouse.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes spathulata x veitchii

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, vacuum-formed and extruded plastic, ceramic.

Price: $ 200US

Shirt Price: $ 150US

Enclosure Gallery: Weintraub Gate (2015)

Weintraub Gate (2015)

Description: The pitcher plant Nepenthes spectrabilis is best known for its narrow pitchers covered in burgundy and yellow-green markings. This specimen is old enough that it has started vining, displaying both upper and lower pitchers.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes spectrabilis

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, ceramic, wood.

Price: $ 200US

Shirt Price: $ 150US

Enclosure Gallery: Dimension Mask (2016)

Dimension Mask (2016)

Description: Based on experiences with the multiple coats on the mask, one can argue that all human art forms are ultimately derived from painting, if only to find something to do while the paint dries. This was necessary, though, with strontium europium luminous paint under multiple coats of clear sealer, copied on the ovoids surrounding a glass disk. The hybrid “Bloody Mary” combines exceptional pitcher color with a habit of multiple growing points at its base, causing it to spread outward instead of vining up.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes “Bloody Mary”

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, polycarbonate mask, polished fiber optic cable, tumbled glass, grapevine, found items.

Price: $250US

Shirt Price: $ 200US

Enclosure Gallery: Launch Bay (2015)

Launch Bay (2015)

Description: The Nepenthes hybrid “King of Spades” is best known for its large pitchers with huge flaring peristomes, but such large pitchers also lead to very slow growth of the rest of the plant. Because of this, in a suitable enclosure, at least four pitchers are visible and accessible, with older pitchers dying off shortly after new ones open. Because of its slow growth, this “King of Spades” is only now starting to obscure the enclosure’s backdrop, adding to the impression of a facility abandoned for unknown reasons.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 24″ x 24 1/2″ x 18″ (60.96 cm x 62.23 cm x 45.72 cm)

Plant: Nepenthes “King of Spades”

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, polyvinyl, glass.

Price: $ 250US

Shirt Price: $ 200US

Enclosure Gallery: Borne (2017)

Borne (2017)

Description: One of the more evocative images in the Jeff VanderMeer novel Borne (2017) was of what appeared to be three dead astronauts buried to their armpits in an open area by an abandoned office building: three individuals in biohazard suits, the suits so blasted by ultraviolet light that the fabric bleached white, with various plants growing out of their open faceplates. Combine this with the title character being mistaken for a plant in the early stages of its life cycle, and a centerpiece of a Nepenthes veitchii was necessary.

Dimensions (width/height/depth): 18 1/2″ x 24 1/2″ x 18 1/2″ (46.99 cm x 60.96 cm x 46.99 cm)

Plant:Nepenthes veitchii

Construction: Glass enclosure, polystyrene foam, vacuum-formed plastic, polyester cloth.

Price: $ 250US

Shirt Price: $ 200US

State of the Gallery


Four months. Four months since the old Triffid Ranch location had to shut down, and we had to track down a new space. Four months of potting, painting, sweeping, drilling, screwing (keep your mind out of the gutter), stacking, pitching, dumping (again with the bathroom humor), repositioning, and vacuuming. Four months of discovering the joys of the difference between renting residential and commercial properties, the vagaries of plumbing replacement, and the tribulations of a moth invasion that came literally from nowhere. Four months of learning more about security systems, air conditioning units, bathroom plumbing, and glass polishing than anyone would think was necessary, and then the real fun with potting and prepping plants began. Combine this with two of the biggest Triffid Ranch shows of the year in the middle, and the necessary downtime on gallery preparation to focus on those shows, and guess what?

We’re nearly there.

Things still aren’t perfect: one of the advantages to the new gallery is a significant increase in usable wall area and volume, along with a nearly exponential increase in power outlets compared to the old Valley View space. This means doubling the old space’s shelf space, which also goes with an increase of usable floor area and tables to take advantage of it. This means that the next big Triffid Ranch exhibition is tentatively scheduled for mid-October, just to build enough enclosures to fill all that new display space. (Sadly, the regular ARTwalk exhibitions are as dead as Valley View’s artist community, because the time lost in preparing for and cleaning up after each ARTwalk cut into enclosure preparation and construction time.) Details will follow, but the upshot is that the Triffid Ranch opens for commissions and consultation as of July 1. 

(Please note: as with the Valley View space, the new gallery is open by appointment only, preferably with at least 24 hours’ advance notice. Apologies for the inconvenience, but a day job intrudes.) 

And on the subject of shows, the rest of summer and all of autumn are going to be busy, with things staying lively all the way through the end of November. Many of the events are awaiting final confirmation, but Small-Con in Addison on September 9 and the Blood Over Texas Horror for the Holidays show in Austin on November 19 are absolutes. As this changes, the calendar will be updated accordingly. This goes double for events in spring 2018: vendor applications for Texas Frightmare Weekend officially open on June 23, and we hope to have a special surprise lined up for next April. We’ll see how it goes.

In other developments, visitors at the Dallas Arboretum may have noticed the new carnivorous plant bog in the Children’s Adventure Garden, and expect more carnivores very quickly. Because of a bumper crop of second-year plants from last year’s seedlings, getting the new plants potted up requires having to make room, and the big established Sarracenia are perfect for the Arboretum’s purposes. Expect photos soon, especially if our expected rains on Saturday don’t wash us all back to Oz, because everyone involved really made an exceptional display, and it just needs more plants to fill out the area. It has a way to go before it can compete with the Atlanta Botanic Garden’s carnivore beds, but the challenge is half of the fun. 

Free plugs: both of these deserve proper reviews, but keep an eye open for both the BBC/PBS two-part miniseries Plants Behaving Badly, narrated by Sir David Attenborough, and the new Janit Calvo book The Gardening In Miniature Prop Shop, published by Timber Press. The former dedicates one episode each to carnivorous plants and orchids, and the only issue with either is that one hour is nowhere near enough time for a decent presentation. The latter, though, is going to be an essential resource in the Triffid Ranch workshop, so buy both for the best effect. And so it goes. 

 

Driving with the top down

Okay, so the best adjective to describe the last few months is “hectic”. The news this month about the mall coming down led to the start of a search for a new location. The bad news is that thanks to the current hipster explosion in the Oak Cliff area, gallery space is available, if $18 per square foot and up is “affordable”. The good news is that thanks to the expansion of available technology, the huge office parks built throughout the Dallas area at the beginning of the century, in anticipation of a huge sustained dotcom boom dead for fifteen years, are increasingly affordable and open to new uses. We don’t know what the rest of the year is going to bring us, but the plan right now is to stay at Midtown for as long as we can: it’s a central locale, we have great neighbors, and people now come by solely to see what’s in the window this week. (And before you ask, photos will follow soon enough.)

The only problem with the mall involves people being able to find the space. As with most malls, corridor junctions have those huge “You are here” directories: unfortunately, since the mall’s coming down soon enough, the owners can’t justify spending money to update those directory maps as galleries and businesses move in and out. Since those directories list the previous gallery in our location, customers and visitors come in, check out the gallery, don’t see our name, and get confused. The obvious solution was to add signage that gave directions and intrigued passersby. But considering how easily we as a society blank out on incessant advertising, is it possible to make signage that might draw people in merely by its presence, even if it’s for a few rounds of “What the hell is that?


The medium made itself accessible soon enough: an Internet radio station getting situated further down the mall pulled these huge Styrofoam blanks from alcoves in their walls and set them aside. This being an art gallery community, most disappeared as soon as they were offered, propped up on one end, and used as temporary print and photo displays. Thankfully, one remained, and after a few weeks of shaping with heat guns, painting, and augmentation, the new Triffid Ranch sign went up on the main mall floor, within view of the escalator leading to the movie theater. It’s not to the level of a Jay Sherman book promotion cutout, but what is?

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So there you have it. Combined with dispensers for promotional postcards, it not only brings in interested bystanders, but it fits in with the general theme and intention. Now let’s see if I can find another foam core in order to put another sign directly in front of the space.

T-shirt Extravaganza From Larry Carey Art

New Triffid Ranch banner by Larry Carey

Last week, I mentioned that big news was coming from Larry Carey Art, so here’s the situation. For the last several years, quite a few people expressed interest in T-shirts and other items featuring Larry’s very distinctive Triffid Ranch poster (seen above), but the logistics got in the way. Table space at Triffid Ranch shows reserved for T-shirts took away table space for plants, and a previous T-shirt printing didn’t work out anywhere near as well as hoped. Sadly, while the concept of the shirts received a lot of notice and attention, the follow-through was a little lacking. Understandable, really: with so many online distractions, it’s hard to remember “Hey, I really want to get that T-shirt” if it can’t be a quick, boom-boom-boom instant transaction.

Well, guess who now has shirts available via quick, boom-boom-boom instant transaction?

Wait: it gets better. The Texas Triffid Ranch officially partners with Larry Carey Art to produce new shirts and other items via RedBubble, and T-shirts are just part of the bounty. Need a drawstring bag? How about a spiral notebook? (Currently, shower curtains are available through a different source, but as soon as they’re available, I’m getting one myself.)

Now, you may think “Okay, so my purchase of a T-shirt is one more step toward respect for a truly unique artist, but what does this do for ME?” That’s a really good question. See, that T=shirt isn’t just a T-shirt. Wear that shirt to an ARTwalk event starting in July, or any Triffid Ranch show, and wearing that shirt offers perks not available to mere mortals. Among other things, larger enclosures will come with both the standard price and the shirt price, with the shirt price being between 10 and 25 percent off. This also includes getting free items, ranging from plants to books, just by showing up wearing a shirt. The deal, though, is that you have to be wearing it to get the benefits: just like a machete or a wad of $100 bills, that shirt does you no good if it’s stuck in the back of a dresser drawer. When you do, though, the benefits keep coming for the life of the shirt or the life of the Triffid Ranch. If the arms fall off and the panel becomes a patch on a jacket, it’s still valid, so long as it’s wearable.

Anyway, the next big opportunity to use your powers comes with the July ARTwalk on July 15, with the big InfiniCon show three weeks later, so get in that order now. You’re not only helping out an artist whom I’ve admired for the last decade, but you’re also helping yourself. Now back to the music.

Interludes and Background

It’s been a while since the last update, what with just-finished shows and other events. Let’s rectify that, shall we? After all, Midtown Artwalk is a little over a week away, and Black Friday is two weeks from now…image
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